5 Street Food Dishes You Must Try in Shanghai

5 Street Food Dishes You Must Try in Shanghai


Welcome to Shanghai, China’s financial capital. Situated on the east coast with its modern skyline, it’s hard not to get distracted by all the towering skyscrapers. But stay closer to the ground, and you’ll find quaint neighborhoods serving up some of the city’s best food. Shanghai is an immigrant city, so the cuisine here is all about blending flavors from different parts of the country. In this episode, we take you on a breakfast journey Shanghai style. Or youtiao, are popular throughout China because they can be eaten by itself, wrapped in a crepe, or dipped in savory soy milk. It’s a crunchy, carby, savory comfort food. Many people drink soy milk by itself, but locals in Shanghai love adding toppings such as soy sauce and seasoning to their milk. Found all over southern China, these delicate purses of meat, called huntun, are freshly wrapped every morning with pork and a generous helping of vegetables and chives. Soup dumplings, or xiaolongbao, were born in this part of China. Minced pork and gelatinized broth is wrapped in a thin wheat wrapper. These pan-fried buns, or shengjian, started appearing in Shanghai teahouses in the 1930s. They’re stuffed with pork, and topped with scallions and sesame seeds. If you’re ever in Shanghai, you can find these street eats at these five places. Fried dough sticks, savory soy milk, wonton, soup dumplings, pan-fried buns. And if you’re still hungry, explore some more. Your stomach will thank you. we’ll be taking you to Taiwan, where late night is the way to do street food. Make sure to tune in. And if you missed our Chengdu “5 Street Eats,” check out the link below. See you next time, and happy eating wherever you are.

11 Replies to “5 Street Food Dishes You Must Try in Shanghai

  1. First two reminds me of Taiwan. I'd love to try the northern take on wonton though. Is that chive, or some LESSER green?

    Lastly. Gotta comment on the pan fried buns. I love that this place does it smooth side up, meaning the pleated part gets pan fried. More surface area = more crunchy goodness. Not a fan of the places that decode to pan dry the buns smooth side down.

    Thanks for another great video!

  2. ohh. somehow when I think Shanghai I think of sweet sugary Chinese foods but not from Shanghai 😅 just based on one visit, maybe fam was being adventurous aha

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